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A Message to JDCC

A Message to JDCC

Dear JDCC Board,

I would like to take this opportunity to extend my deepest gratitudes for your organization's support of the first ever NYC Deaf Chanukah Celebration. Baruch Hashem, it was an amazing and successful event. We had over 300 participants, with at least forty children. From all the positive feedback that I have gotten from the community, I can see that it made big waves for Jewish Deaf people everywhere. Our community has a lot of room for growth and expansion, and together with your help, we are making that happen!

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Interpreted Shabbat Service - NYC

Interpreted Shabbat Service - NYC

WHAT: A Service with full readings from the Torah and Haftorah (Prophets)

WHEN: 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM on Saturday, February 7th

WHERE: Town & Village (T&V) Synagogue
334 East 14th Street,
Manhattan
[between 1st and 2nd Avenues]

A Kiddush (refreshment and social hour) will follow Services on each day, as usual, and all are welcome to participate!

Out of respect for Shabbat, pen, paper and electronic devices cannot be used at these Services. For additional information, please contact Bram at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (212) 677-0368 Voice.

Source: Bram Weiser

Jewish, Deaf and Proud at Historic Chanukah Events

Jewish, Deaf and Proud at Historic Chanukah Events

Photo: Chabad-Lubavitch Rabbi Yehoshua Soudakoff converses in sign language at the first ever Chanukah event for the deaf Jewish community in New York City.

Chabad Lubavitch World HQ / News
by Dovid Zaklikowski - New York, NY
December 30, 2014

At the first ever Chanukah event for the deaf community in New York, the excitement was silent but palpable.

“Wow, overwhelming crowds! Feeling wonderful!” posted Robert Ross, during the event on his Facebook page. “Deaf Jewish proud! Fantastic Chanukah celebrations.”

The event at The Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan, New York, with a children’s program, entertainment for the deaf, and lots of traditional Chanukah edibles—all a the foot of a 9-foot tall menorah, was one of three such events on the East Coast.

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Cued In

Cued In

By CARLY GERBER
JUF News
Posted: 12/23/2014 11:03:20 AM

The smell of fresh brew and the sounds of friendly conversation fill a Chicago coffeehouse. There, I meet Benjamin Lachman, who drinking a steaming cup, gives me the following instructions: One: give him a thumb's up if I need him to raise his voice. Two: he will write down words I cannot understand.

"The primary challenge for a deaf individual is to open communication pathways," Lachman, who was born deaf, wrote in an e-mail.  

Following the diagnosis of Lachman's deafness when he was 1 years old, his parents, Ronald and Mary Ann, attempted to learn sign language. They found the process disappointing. First, sign language is a separate language from English, which makes it more difficult for children who are deaf to learn how to read in English. While Lachman was learning sign language, he was more than a year behind in language and the reading level of his classmates, who were not deaf. Second, his parents had trouble learning sign language altogether. If Lachman was curious about the moon, they'd have to pull out a textbook to look up the sign for "Moon." Since their sign language vocabulary was limited, so was his.  

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